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« Daily Mail: "Cameron backtracks on drugs downgrade" | Main | Heffer versus Cameron (a continuing series) »

Comments

Ian Bruce

Jules I agree entirely with Davis's policy of focussing on the bottom 25% of society. I think its one of the better sides of Davis's campaign and I hope that Cameron takes it on.

My problem with Davis is that he is deliberately pursuing policies which he knows are popular with members (to get himself elected at this stage) to the detriment of our success with the electorate in the country.

David Davis talks the talk of appealing to the North, Scotland and Wales but then announces he'll cut a third off income tax. Anyone for a shot through the foot?

When will we learn that churning out the same policies on tax, europe and immigration is not the answer. We need to sit down and create a vision for people to buy into. That is what Cameron can do.

Jonathan Sheppard

I do sometimes wonder about some of the people who post on here.

If it was a choice between Brown or Cameron as PM I would want a Tory to be in charge. Sometimes people give the impression that they would rather Labour win then an alternative leadership candidate win.

Barbara Villiers

Well, duh, Ian. He never said he'd cut 1/3 off income tax. Read the above posts. Listen and learn. That is the problem with young people - they think they have all the answers.

So what's Cameron's vision? So far it's been re-classifyig ecstasy, reclassifying ecstasy and re-classifying ecstasy.

Daniel Vince-Archer

"So what's Cameron's vision? So far it's been re-classifyig ecstasy, reclassifying ecstasy and re-classifying ecstasy."

That's not fair Barbara. He's also pledged to establish a toothless, expensive quango, sorry I mean 'powerful new independent body' to look at the issue of climate change.

Jonathan Sheppard

What is that vision Ian? That is what was raised at the meeting in Loncoln. There were people minded to vote for Cameron - but they wanted to know what that vision was.

I cant believe that Cameron doesnt think taxes are too high.

I dont think Cameron would suggest that we should give more powers to the EU, and I dont think Cameron would suggest that we should be more liberal with regards immigration policy - so in that sense isnt the vision in those areas very much status quo?

Barbara Villiers

Of course he doesn't think taxes are too high - he's loaded!

Jonathan Sheppard

Now now Barbara.

It was interesting to note that when he was pressed on the tax issue on Question Time his view was business taxation needed to be sorted out first.

For me this is a mistake. Working for a FTSE 100 company who is being hit with a variety of property and other hidden taxes - including Alcohol Disorder Zones, Business Improvement Districts and so on - it is clear these have been pushed by the Government for the reason that they know businesses don't have votes.

If as both candidates have suggested - they want to appeal to those who have deserted us you need to look at policies which the voters want.

Ian Bruce

Answering some of these points before I go pretend I have something better to do on a Saturday night...

Firstly thanks to Barbara and Daniel for bringing up two fine examples of the good examples of why I like David Cameron.

On climate change what David Cameron has said is that something that important shouldn't be a political football. We need to create a national consensus and work towards it over a sustained period of time recognising that governments may change but the policy shouldn't.

On the ecstasy argument I refer you to the main reason why I believe in the Conservative party. I believe in the right of the individual to be free to do as they choose providing they don't hurt others in doing so... "Rights, Responsibilities & Rercussions"

The vast majority of young professionals and students have at some point taken ecstasy. It is relatively safe compared to drinking and smoking. Yet we class it alongside heroin - one of the most lethal and addictive substances. What sort of impression does that give to people, particularly in terms of heroin.

For Cameron's vision I refer you to www.cameroncampaign.org . The section on "recasting our values" is particularly relevant.

P.S. Barbara, young people may think they know all the answers. But if you're not a "young person" then surely you've been around long enough to know that what we say is not going to be how we're quoted by the Labour party.

Jonathan Sheppard

"The vast majority of young professionals and students have at some point taken ecstasy. It is relatively safe compared to drinking and smoking."

Sorry I wont accept this argument at all.

Can you die from drinking one pint, from having one fag or taking one E?

On what evidence do you base the fact that a majoity of young people/professionals have taken ectasy??

Sally Rideout Baker

"Maybe being half yank I have a great deal more time for self made people than for those born into privilege who then behave as they ought to rule by divine right."

Only self made people allowed to stand?

Reverse snobbery it is called.

Of course one of the questions that was never answered was whether any past history of the candidates was lightly to be an embarrassment!

Davis was possibly christened as Brown and taken the name David Davis at his Bar Mitzvah?

Equally David Cameron (why do we have so many Davids?) has been a bit coy.

At least Ken Clarke and the current Grass Root Elected Leader - Iain Duncan Smith had clean sheets (as it were) apart from the smoking of Tobacco.

On the other hand Tobacco is also a drug and as difficult to give up as the other nasties.

Ed R

The shift is no great surprise. The Telegraph puts it pithily:

"First, as the underdog, he is benefiting from low expectations. Second, he has demoted the MPs who mismanaged his early campaign. Third, there is a degree of market correction to the dumping of Davis shares that followed his Blackpool speech. Fourth, and most significant, he is appealing solely to party activists, whereas David Cameron, believing himself to be ahead, is pitching at the wider electorate."

Cameron could have come out a good deal better, but Davis would have struggled not to make his position better given his Blackpool speech.

Daniel Vince-Archer

"On climate change what David Cameron has said is that something that important shouldn't be a political football. We need to create a national consensus and work towards it over a sustained period of time recognising that governments may change but the policy shouldn't."

Ian, important issues like climate change require real solutions, not token gestures. I certainly don't think the issue should be treated as a political football but if we start delegating responsibility for important issues to unelected, unaccountable bodies, we may as well dispense with politics and democracy altogether.

John Coulson

I think this thread has turned into name calling. I wish they didn't.......

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