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Teck

Andrew Lilico at 06:34 PM

Indeed, Andrew.

There is a continuum of dissatisfaction, so in tactical terms, our claim to legitimacy as the next government must therefore lie with our ability to demonstrate willingness and sound reasoning in addressing the most severe dissenters and everything else “under the curve” – i.e. we need to show courage with distinctive, even radical, policies that the present government lack to put matters right.

I am in agreement with various aspects of Stephan's claims and your interpretation of them. My contribution, however, is more mundane ("real world") and comes from the unique privilege and experience in dealing with the entire spectrum of political affiliations and social classes.

james

If Mr Cameron is the only conservative leadership alternative, the Conservative Party will lose the next two national elections. The party needs to study greater conservative party successes elsewhere - in Canada, Australia, and France in particular. Here in Britain, something is seriously wonky; the Tory leader appears contrived rather than slick, too obviously derivative rather than fresh or vital. Nor does he give the appearance of a man who wants first prize.

Mr Cameron's background, too, is a political problem: it can indicate a certain feyness/dilettantishness, it appears to many in (and outside) the UK to be chronologically misplaced in modern Britain. Britain will not vote for Mr Cameron for several reasons: his personal and professional background, his political style, and now, his political judgement (his Ealing by-election strategy, and now his Rwandan 'State Visit' will most certainly be used against him in the next national election). None of these features can resonate with an increasingly discerning and very media-savvy Britain post-Blair.

Can Mr Cameron change? Perhaps, but it is unlikely. Nor is he a politically talented enough individual to avoid defeat by a lethal gamesman and Prime Minister at the next national poll.

Guarantee it. Mr Cameron is no Mr Harper, Mr Howard, or M. Sarkozy. Nor is he a Tony Blair. But he should be of their stature - in order to win a national election. It'll be some other MP's turn, I suspect.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown, by contrast, appears to be slowly working up to political greatness.


Best wishes,

TomTOm

Cameron is not currently in government and as such there is a limit to what he can do to resolve the flooding crisis except give moral support.

Don't we pay Cameron £160,000pa from the Consolidated Fund to do this job - yet Arthur Waik tells me You might do better to vent your anger on the people who *are* in government

So now I pay for a dog and must bark myself !

This is a funny notion of government. I think it is the job of The Opposition to hold the Executive to account

TomTOm

Cameron is not currently in government and as such there is a limit to what he can do to resolve the flooding crisis except give moral support.

Don't we pay Cameron £160,000pa from the Consolidated Fund to do this job - yet Arthur Waik tells me You might do better to vent your anger on the people who *are* in government

So now I pay for a dog and must bark myself !

This is a funny notion of government. I think it is the job of The Opposition to hold the Executive to account

TomTOm

Cameron is not currently in government and as such there is a limit to what he can do to resolve the flooding crisis except give moral support.

Don't we pay Cameron £160,000pa from the Consolidated Fund to do this job - yet Arthur Waik tells me You might do better to vent your anger on the people who *are* in government

So now I pay for a dog and must bark myself !

This is a funny notion of government. I think it is the job of The Opposition to hold the Executive to account

Teck

James; July 24, 2007 at 05:20 PM

"Britain will not vote for Mr Cameron for several reasons: his personal and professional background, his political style, and now, his political judgement..."

Who is/are the candidate(s) who "can resonate with an increasingly discerning and very media-savvy Britain post-Blair?"

james

Teck:

'Who is/are the candidate(s) who "can resonate with an increasingly discerning and very media-savvy Britain post-Blair?" '

One would have thought your answer obvious:

'One or some individuals among those without the aforementioned 'D. Cameron' features!'

Defend Mr Cameron as your choice for leader to win either or both of the next two general elections at least, if you can.

Best wishes,

Simon Denis

Quite so, Mr Shakespeare, but the tory modernisers have been insulting the tory party and especially the right since they first stirred into life. The fact that we have generally buttoned our lips and stayed loyal - whether as out and out rightists or ordinary conservatives - will in no way mitigate the venom with which they routinely spray us. These people, who have made a total mess of two by-elections, presume to tell their critics that they "don't get" politics. For them, politics is not a matter of belief but a matter of careers. Having served up a nice, juicy defeat they will leave these still socialist shores and take up jobs in the States - probably not in politics. As to you points about social acceptability don't you realise that the left has managed to manipulated the notion of what is and what is not acceptable to the point where all seriously conservative politics is now off limits? Only Labour is allowed to stray on to right wing territory now, and then merely with a view to calming down adverse criticism. They actually do nothing. We should stick two fingers up to the current illiberal parody of liberalism and assert our views vigorously. Courage attracts support, not cowardly compromise.

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